Uppercase Magazine #26

uppercase 26 cover

Every time I receive a copy of Uppercase Magazine, Canada’s fabulous art/design/illustration publication, I think to myself that surely it can’t surpass the previous one, as it was so fantastic. And every time I’m delighted to find it’s even better than the last! There isn’t another magazine on the planet like it; utterly original, and every page a piece of art in itself. The current issue is all about postage stamps and postage stamp art, and lots more, too. Take a free flip through the pages of the latest issue and see if you can spot my children’s postage stamp illustration inside (page 60)…

Colours of Happiness

J.H. Lartigue, colour 6 J.H. Lartigue, colour 5 J.H. Lartigue, colour 4 J.H. Lartigue, colour 3 J.H. Lartigue, colour 2 J.H. Lartigue, colour 1If ever there was a photographer of happiness, Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894-1986) was it. From about the age of eight, he was capturing images of people in their various states of happiness, elegance and humour. If you happen to be in Paris this summer, there’s an exhibition of his colour work, ‘Lartigue: La Vie en Couleurs‘, at the Maison Européenne until August 23. Known mainly for his gorgeous black and white work, his colour photographs are equally superlative in their delight to what he finds behind his viewfinder. American Photography says of him, “Jacques Henri Lartigue (June 13, 1894 – September 12, 1986) is best known for the black-and-white photographs he made as a youth in early 20th-century France. Born to a wealthy family outside of Paris, he began taking pictures when he was eight, documenting his family’s life and joyous adventures through the early years of the 20th century. These were purely personal images, created for his own amusement, and they remained hidden away in family photo albums for years—in fact, until Lartigue was 69, when his photographs were discovered by John Szarkowski, then curator of the photography department at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Szarkowski recognized the work as that of a genius who had captured some essential, whimsical and wistful element of the human character. Less known are the color photographs Lartigue shot—and he shot lot of them: Forty percent of the 111,000 negatives on file at the Lartigue foundation are color. He began experimenting with the autochrome process as a boy, and, asArchitectural Digest  notes, the Pointillist results appealed to Lartigue, whose primary passion was painting. Through the 1920s, he used autochrome to photograph his first wife, Bibi, and the chic French set at play on the Riviera, the Alps, and in Paris. After World War II, Lartigue embraced Kodak Ektachrome.”…

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